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Frederick Douglass

Old-Fashioned, Elevated, Plain, Personal, Biblical

❶Selected speeches and writings. While Garrison's words validate Douglass's ability to tell his own story, Phillips's letter validates Douglass's ability to narrate history.

The Writings of Frederick Douglass

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by Frederick Douglass

To access many of the new West Chester University Website features, you'll need to turn on JavaScript and enable cookies. You can do this in your web browser's settings area. Born a slave in on a plantation in Maryland, Douglass taught himself to read and write.

In , seven years after escaping to the North, he published Narrative, the first of three autobiographies. This book calmly but dramatically recounts the horrors and the accomplishments of his early years-the daily, casual brutality of the white masters; his painful efforts to educate himself; his decision to find freedom or die; and his harrowing but successful escape. An astonishing orator and a skillful writer, Douglass became a newspaper editor, a political activist, and an eloquent spokesperson for the civil rights of African Americans.

He lived through the Civil War, the end of slavery, and the beginning of segregation. He was celebrated internationally as the leading black intellectual of his day, and his story still resonates in ours. Written during his celebrated career as a speaker and newspaper editor, My Bondage and My Freedom reveals the author of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass grown more mature, forceful, analytical, and complex with a deepened commitment to the fight for equal rights and liberties.

Hayes; also his appointment by President J. Garfield to be recorder of deeds in Washington; with many other interesting and important events of his most eventful life; with an introduction by Mr. Slaveholders understand that literacy would lead slaves to question the right of whites to keep slaves. Finally, by keeping slaves illiterate, Southern slaveholders maintain control over what the rest of America knows about slavery.

If slaves cannot write, their side of the slavery story cannot be told. Wendell Phillips makes this point in his prefatory letter to the Narrative. Just as slave owners keep men and women as slaves by depriving them of knowledge and education, slaves must seek knowledge and education in order to pursue freedom. It is from Hugh Auld that Douglass learns this notion that knowledge must be the way to freedom, as Auld forbids his wife to teach Douglass how to read and write because education ruins slaves.

Douglass sees that Auld has unwittingly revealed the strategy by which whites manage to keep blacks as slaves and by which blacks might free themselves.

Doug-lass presents his own self-education as the primary means by which he is able to free himself, and as his greatest tool to work for the freedom of all slaves. Though Douglass himself gains his freedom in part by virtue of his self-education, he does not oversimplify this connection.

Douglass has no illusions that knowledge automatically renders slaves free. Knowledge helps slaves to articulate the injustice of slavery to themselves and others, and helps them to recognize themselves as men rather than slaves.

Rather than provide immediate freedom, this awakened consciousness brings suffering, as Hugh Auld predicts. Once slaves are able to articulate the injustice of slavery, they come to loathe their masters, but still cannot physically escape without meeting great danger. In the Narrative, Douglass shows slaveholding to be damaging not only to the slaves themselves, but to slave owners as well. With this theme, Douglass completes his overarching depiction of slavery as unnatural for all involved.

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() Words like "exhibition" and "spectacle" remind us that, even though Douglass is remembering something he saw as a child, he's a well-educated adult now. He seems to want to show us that his hard-earned education was a success.

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In Frederick Douglass published the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, and Written by Himself. In it, he criticizes directly—often with withering irony—those who defend slavery and those who prefer a romanticized version of it.

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Get an answer for 'What style of writing did Frederick Douglass use in his autobiography?' and find homework help for other Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave questions. Frederick Douglass's narrative of his life is a profile in both moral and physical courage. In the narrative Douglass openly illustrates and attacks the misuse of Christianity as a defense of slavery.

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“No book except perhaps Uncle Tom’s Cabin had as powerful an impact on the abolitionist movement as Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. But while Stowe wrote about imaginary characters, Douglass’s book is a record of his own remarkable life. Born a slave in on a plantation in Maryland, Douglass taught himself to read and write. Frederick Douglass: Selected Speeches and Writings (The Library of Black America series) [Frederick Douglass, Philip S. Foner, Yuval Taylor] on guntuyuk.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. One of the greatest African American leaders and one of the most brilliant minds of his time, Frederick Douglass spoke and wrote with unsurpassed eloquence on almost all the major issues confronting /5(59).